Fishing Reports

Lake Lanier Fishing Report

The Striped Bass are transitioning into shallower water and making their pilgrimage up the lake into the creeks. Gainesville Creek is a good area this time of year. Lool for these fish to set up on a 20 to 30 ft bottom. They seem to hang around the schools of bait fish. Find the bait and the fish should be somewhere close!
Walleye
Lake Lanier Walleye population seems to be healthy. These fish have started biting the last few nights on a 30 to 40ft bottom on long points that connect to the river channels. We have been throwing jerk baits and Shad Raps fire tiger pattern and catching a few fish.

Lake Burton Fishing

Lake Burton Fishing Report
Water temp. 68
Level. Full
Clarity. Clear
Walleye
The Walleye have finally starting feeding shallower on the northern lakes. These fish are biting in the 30 to 40 ft depths. We have been catching them downlining Blue-Back Herring in and around main lake points. Look for the Walleye to pull up in the 20ft range over the next few weeks. A 3/8oz jig head tipped with a Zoom Fat Albert will be the ticket.
Bass
The top water bite has begun with big schools showing up on main lake points and out over the main lake channel. These fish are aggressive and numerous. We have been catching most of the fish on Lucky Craft Sammy’s. We are not seeing the size of fish that we have in the past but the number of fish seem to be up. Look for this bite to continue and the swim bait bite to pick up. The low 60 deg mark seems to be the best bite on the northern Lakes.
Trout
The Brown Trout bite has really taken off! Most of the fish we have been targeting have been up shallow chasing the Herring around. This is a good time of year to sight fish for the trout. Keep a Rapala countdown or a Rooster tail ready. Some of the trout we have caught have been in the 5lbs range and long. The Brown Trout should continue to feed shallower in the next few weeks. The optimum temperatures for these fish seems to be in the high 50deg range. Start looking for the trout to make thier way towards the creek channels to spawn.
Good Luck!
Wes Carlton
Georgia Lake Fishing
www.georgialakefishing.com
7703189777

Lake Lanier Fishing

It’s been. A long hot summer in Northern Georgia Gainesville area. The fish have been biting but have been deep most of the summer. The Georgia Striped Bass will start migrating north as soon as the water cools into the low 70s. These fish can be tough to catch up with sometimes. That’s why electronics play a vital role in locating schools of fish. Lool for these fish to pull up on a 30 to 40 ft bottom over the next few weeks.

Lake Burton Fishing

Lake Burton Fishing Report

Water temp 75deg

Level: 1ft down

Clarity: clear

Bass

The bass bite has really picked up. These fish had been feeding late in the evenings and during the wee hours of nightfall. They have been up chasing the Blue-Backs around in the afternoons on the surface. A small top water bait like a Chug or a small Sammy has been working well for these fish. These fish should start coming up shallower as the water temps cool towards the lower 70’s.

Trout

The Brown Trout has been extremely slow this summer. The live bait bite has produced some really nice size fish but not many of them. We have been marking some big schools this year on the fish finder but only catching a couple before the school vacates the area. I fish a night recently and found that the trout were feeding good between 10am and 2 pm. Go figure? The population seems to be healthy this year and I anticipate a great fall and winter bite! The North Georgia trout are not into the sweltering heat that we have had this summer. Lake Burton is normally a little cooler than it has been this year. These fish will start feeding in the next few weeks during the morning and evening. The trolling bite will pick back up and be a great way to catch a wall hanger!

Yellow Perch

The Perch bite has been on fire this year. These schools of fish have been a little deeper than most summers. We have caught them as deep as 50ft. Drop shotting has been the best technique for catching these fish. This bite should continue to be good through the latter part of October.

Good Luck!

Wes Carlton

7703189777

www.georgialakefishing.com

Lake Lanier Fishing

The south end Striped Bass bite is still going good. Some of the fish are up a little shallower bottom. Trolling lead core line has been very effective.

Lake Burton Fishing

Lake Burton Fishing Report
Water temp 78deg
Level: full
Clarity: clear
Bass
The bass bite has really picked up. These fish had been feeding late in the evenings and during the wee hours of nightfall. The have been up chasing the Blue-Backs around in the afternoons on the surface. A small top water bait like a Chug or a small Sammy has been working well for these fish. These fish should start coming up shallower as the water temps cool towards the lower 70’s.
Trout
The Brown Trout has been extremely slow this summer. The live bait bite has produced some really nice size fish but not many of them. We have been marking some big schools this year on the fish finder but only catching a couple before he school vacates the area. I fish a night recently and found that the trout were feeding good between 10am and 2 pm. Go figure? The population seems to be healthy this year and I anticipate a great fall and winter bite! The North Georgia trout are not into the sweltering heat that we have had this summer. Lake Burton is normally a little cooler than this year. These fish will start feeding in the next few weeks during the morning and evening. The trolling bite will pick back up and be a great way to catch a wall hanger!
Yellow Perch
The Perch bite has been on fire this year. These schools of fish have been a little deeper than most summers. We have caught them as deep as 50ft. Drop shotting has been the best technique for catching these fish.

Good Luck!
Wes Carlton
7703189777
www.georgialakefishing.com

Lake Rabun Fishing

Lake Burton Fishing Report
Water Temp 84deg
Clarity: clear
Level: 6in down

Trout:
The Brown Trout have been hit or miss lately. These fish are on the southern portions of the lake but often glued to the bottom. We have been catching a few fish trolling Lucky Craft pointer 78 jerk baits in Herring Color. These fish should start biting a little better in August as the thermocline settles.
Bass.
The bass are deep right now and unless your near a school of Herring your not going to see much sign of these fish on top. The backs of the creeks still have quite a few bait fish in them and the Spots are chasing them around. Try using some kind of Chug or small top water bait. My other option for Bass fishing is working a drop shot off of the main lake channel points.
Yellow Perch
The Perch are starting to congregate in bigger schools near grass and brush. These fish are generally in the 16 to 25 ft depths. Crappie minnows work great for catching Yellow Perch. These fish hold close to the bottom so keeping your bait near the bottom is essential for catching a mess. These fish should continue this pattern over the next couple of months.

Good Luck!
Wes Carlton
7703189777
Georgialakefishing.com
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Lake Burton Fishing Report

Lake Burton Fishing Report
Water Temp 84deg
Clarity: clear
Level: 6in down

Trout:
The Brown Trout have been hit or miss lately. These fish are on the southern portions of the lake but often glued to the bottom. We have been catching a few fish trolling Lucky Craft pointer 78 jerk baits in Herring Color. These fish should start biting a little better in August as the thermocline settles.
Bass.
The bass are deep right now and unless your near a school of Herring your not going to see much sign of these fish on top. The backs of the creeks still have quite a few bait fish in them and the Spots are chasing them around. Try using some kind of Chug or small top water bait. My other option for Bass fishing is working a drop shot off of the main lake channel points.
Yellow Perch
The Perch are starting to congregate in bigger schools near grass and brush. These fish are generally in the 16 to 25 ft depths. Crappie minnows work great for catching Yellow Perch. These fish hold close to the bottom so keeping your bait near the bottom is essential for catching a mess. These fish should continue this pattern over the next couple of months.

Good Luck!
Wes Carlton
7703189777
Georgialakefishing.com
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Lake Lanier Walleye

For many Georgia anglers walleye might seem like some obscure gamefish that’s only found up North. Contrary to that notion, north Georgia is dotted with lakes that have fishable walleye populations. There aren’t many folks fishing for them, and those who are aren’t likely to talk about it. You see, these tasty fish are one of the best kept secrets the state has to offer.

DNR stocks about 700,000 walleye each year in reservoirs on the north end of the state. The current stocking program started in the 1990s to help reduce populations of invasive blueback herring, said WRD Senior Fisheries Biologist Anthony Rabern. Not only did the walleye take to the herring as a main source of food, it made them thrive.

According to a recent DNR study, “We have the fastest growing walleye in America,” Anthony said.

Walleye are stocked at about 1 1/2 inches long and reach approximately 12 inches in their first year of life in Georgia lakes. The state record walleye, caught by Neal Watson out of Lake Russell in 1995, weighed 11-lbs., 6-ozs. Interestingly, Russell is not one of the lakes that receives stockings. Anthony said that record could be broken any day.

“Without a doubt, every lake in our state with walleye in it has a state record fish in it,” he said. “There’s at least a 12-lb. walleye in every one of them. We’ve found them in our surveys.”

Because most anglers in the state know little about how to target the finicky walleye, they’re most often caught by accident by folks fishing for stripers or spotted bass. However, if the right techniques are applied in the right locations at the right times, anglers can count on not only consistent catches of walleye, but on catching some good-sized fish, too.

By far, walleye are the most vulnerable to anglers during their annual spawn, which typically peaks around the last week in March, according to Capt. Wes Carlton, of Gainesville. The prespawn and spawning period is generally spread out from the end of February through April, when it tapers off and the fish move on to deep-water summertime locations. Water temperature is the key to where the fish will be and what they’ll be doing.

“When the water gets to right around 52 degrees, it tells the fish to head upstream into the shallows of the lake’s rivers and creeks,” Wes said.

The male fish will regularly move in and out of the spawning grounds in a lakes’ tributary rivers, while females tend to only move into the spawning grounds for short periods of time at night until they’ve dropped all their eggs, Anthony said.

As a result, Anthony said most anglers will find themselves catching primarily male fish of good eating size between 2 and 4 pounds. While most fish caught will be males, the females often run as heavy as 8 to 10 pounds.

Since walleye are primarily nocturnal, dawn and dusk are great times to target them, as is night fishing.

“Some anglers report there is a ‘golden hour’ right before nightfall when walleye bite best,” Anthony said.

Wes backed that statement, “As the sun sets, they’ll move into 16 to 24 inches of water to feed before they run into the river to spawn. That’s a good time to catch them on shallow-running crankbaits in brilliant colors. I don’t care what color it is, as long as it’s bright.”

If you’re starting out early in the morning, it’s best to start cranking the shallows and move deeper as the sun rises. Crank that bait down, and bump it on the bottom. The commotion will often draw a strike.

Another bait widely used up North that hasn’t caught on here yet is a two-hook in-line spinner that serves as a harness for your nightcrawler. Rig a nightcrawler on the hooks. Clamp on enough split-shot a couple feet in front of the spinner to get it to the bottom, depending on the depth of the fish, and drag the rig across the bottom just fast enough to keep the blade spinning.

“As the sun comes up, those fish will pull down into 6 to 9 feet of water into rocks and brushpiles,” Wes said.

As the daylight comes on strong, dropping live bait like blueback herring and medium minnows right over fish is one of the best ways to entice a bite. Fishing nightcrawlers just off the bottom is another good technique. In order to fish live bait successfully, though, you must have a decent depthfinder to help you locate fish.

Trolling plugs both with or without downriggers can also work to locate fish during the day. Concentrate on points, brushpiles, rockpiles and rocky outcroppings, preferably in the shade.

“If there’s a brushpile, they’re going to be in it,” Wes said. “The most difficult thing is getting those fish out of the brush.”

Look for the fish to hang out in areas with 20 to 40 feet of water near the top end of the lake, where those depths may be found closest to spawning grounds.

“Walleye are light sensitive, so when you’re fishing a point or brush, they’re going to be on the north, or shaded, side of the structure,” Wes said.

When they’re deep and tight to brush and structure, a drop-shot rig — just like you’d use to hoist spotted bass out of brush — can be a good choice.

Fishing along light-inhibiting mudlines, which offer passing morsels of food and a good ambush site, can be another effective method, Anthony added.

Once you’ve found walleye, it’s important to stay on them. They tend to run in packs. While an increased current from generation on a lake usually improves the fishing, it also makes it tough to stay put in a boat. Wes suggests using a trolling motor or anchoring over located fish.

Another tactic Wes employs is to drop several blueback herring and then cast spoons and plugs around them.

“The bluebacks work like a teaser in that situation,” he said. “They’re just so shiny and lively that the fish sometimes come up just to check them out. They get bit from time to time, too.”

If fishing after dark, Wes recommends using Hydro-Glo sticks, which can be dropped directly in the water alongside the boat. The green light draws baitfish, which draw the walleye, and they can be caught with plugs or on live bait.

Along with the challenge of finding walleye, hooking them can be just as tricky.

“They don’t bite very hard,” Wes said. “They just kind of mouth the bait and take it down slowly.”

As a result, a gentle hookset is best.

Wes, who mainly guides on mountain lakes including Burton, Seed, Rabun, Yonah and Tugalo, as well as Lake Lanier, is optimistic about the future of Georgia’s walleye fishery.

“I look in the next three to five years for these lakes to really improve due to the numbers of fish the DNR is putting in,” Wes said. “There’s already good populations of walleye in these lakes, so it can only get better.”

Perhaps one of the greatest rewards of pursuing walleye is at the dinner table. They have a reputation as superior table fare. Many anglers list walleye as their favorite fish to eat. They’re easy to fillet, and they’re good just about any way you can think to cook them, too.

“They’re a great tasting fish,” Wes said. “It’s a very light, flaky meat. It is definitely not a fishy fish.”

Whether you are looking for a new angling challenge, a great meal or you are already a seasoned walleye angler, the lakes in north Georgia offer just what you’re looking for. Don’t let the locals tell you any differently.

Lake Lanier Fishing

The Striped Bass are heading south for the summer as tbe water temperatures have hit the 80 mark. Gainesville creek was a hot spot for a couple of weeks but has low oxygen content for the Striped Bass to survive. The small fish are able to survive with lower oxygen bit he big fish have to have a higher concentration to survive the warm summers here in this part of georgia. Most of the big schools of fish are south of Browns Bridge hwy 369. These fish have been aggresive and feeding for most of the day. We have been fishing over a 50ft bottom in the mornings and and 80 to 100ft bottom by lunch. Lake Lanier Island Resort area is a good place to catch fish this time of year. We have been catching a few fish on the Capt. Mack Farr Bucktail jig and a big Ben Parker Spoon. Retrieve this spoon at a high rate of speed peiodically pausing on the way in. Come join us for a Lake Lanier Guided fishing trip.